generallyanxious.com

Growing Up Brave: description & reviews on Goodreads

 

With Growing Up Brave by Donna B. Pincus, I am excited to see a book focused on ways to recognize and help children struggling with anxiety. Anxious feelings and excessive worrying can become a habit – an automatic reaction to things. If parents, teachers and loved ones can help children manage this starting at a young age, it gives kids a chance to form healthier, more realistic outlooks on life, becoming happy, productive individuals.

Please see this book’s Goodreads page for a description and reviews from readers…

 

Prozac Nation, by Elizabeth Wurtzel – excerpt #5

 

“You don’t need an excuse to be depressed,” Dr. Sterling told me in one of our sessions. “You just are. You have to stop feeling guilty about it. Feeling guilty is just making you more depressed.” “This is going to sound dumb,” I began, far too aware that everything I said was so trite, “but, the thing is, I really don’t feel like I have a right to be so miserable. I know we can look back and say my father neglected me, my mother smothered me, I was perpetually in an environment that was incoherent to me, but – ” But what? What other excuses do you need? I wasn’t feeling gross enough to mention Bergen-Belsen, cancer, cystic fibrosis, and all the other real reasons to be sorrowful. “But a lot of people have hard childhoods,” I continued, “much harder than mine, and they grow up and get on with it.”

Please see excerpt #3 for my thoughts on depression and guilt…

 

Prozac Nation, by Elizabeth Wurtzel – excerpt #4

 

Samantha often told me about how depressed and despondent she’d once been, how she used to cry herself to sleep in her boyfriend’s bed in London because she felt so lonely, even lying beside him, and how she’d stand up and walk out in the middle of dinner parties without excusing herself because she needed to burst into tears for no apparent reason. She would tell me these things to assure me that I, too, would get over whatever was ailing me. But it seemed pretty hard to believe I’d ever be as together as Samantha, Samantha who was planning to spend her winter break trekking through Nicaragua and El Salvador on a fact-finding mission for her thesis about postwar diplomacy between Central America and the British government. Samatha couldn’t even speak Spanish, but was somehow unfazed by this impediment. Lying in that infirmary bed, the idea of going anywhere with only a thin knowledge of the native tongue, especially a region where dead bodies have been known to turn up in the bathrooms of bus stations, seemed like a task that would require more energy than I would have to expend for the rest of my life. Lying in that infirmary bed, the idea of going to Central America didn’t seem impossible just there and then – it seemed impossible forever. I couldn’t imagine ever getting better. That’s the thing about depression: A human being can survive almost anything, as long as she sees the end in sight. But depression is so insidious, and it compounds daily, that it’s impossible to ever see the end. The fog is like a cage without a key.


When I’ve had the flu, and I’m on the couch watching TV, I see the commercials and think “These people are so happy and they look so healthy. I wonder if I’ll ever be that happy and healthy again.” A little dramatic, I know!

There have been times I’ve had the same reaction to people who have suffered from anxiety/depression and are leading productive lives, just as Wurtzel does here. I think “I am never going to be that healthy. How are they so healthy?” Yet at the same time, I couldn’t help but look at those people and have a glimmer of hope.

Also in this excerpt, Wurtzel does an amazing job putting depression into words:

“A human being can survive almost anything, as long as she sees the end in sight. But depression is so insidious, and it compounds daily, that it’s impossible to ever see the end.”

Maybe quotes like this might help loved ones of depression sufferers understand, maybe just a little.