generallyanxious.com

ANXIETY, NY Times – www.opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/category/anxiety/

Do I really have to sit here for 8 hours?!

Work or school can be a tough place to deal with anxiety. Even though I liked school and have had the fortune of enjoying every job I’ve had since high school, there are times anxiety makes me feel like a captive, chaining me to my desk as I resort to white-knuckling it through the rest of the day.

Eight hours is a long time. But if the day could be broken up into smaller pieces – at least in your mind – so you can say “I’ve made it halfway through the day” or “only 1 hour to go”, it might seem more manageable.

At a past job, there was an automated email I received everyday at 3pm. The email was simply a status about a system I managed, no big deal. But pretty soon, I was looking forward to that email every day. It signaled I had only 1 more hour of work. I’d see the email and buckle back down for 1 more hour. Cause I could make it through 1 hour.

At my current job, I listen to a radio program during lunch – 92.9 dave fm’s “Radio Free Lunch” (now a sports talk station). Everyday there is a topical theme – songs about summer, songs about superheroes for The Avengers movie release, songs with the cheesiest lyrics for National Grilled Cheese Day, song from artists you’d dress up like for Halloween – you get the idea. I look forward to it everyday. It means my work day is halfway through, and I enjoy the anticipation of what songs they’ll play to fit the theme.

It’s a simple, silly thing. But sometimes it’s those things that get you through.

I am an imposter.

Maybe you graduated college. Maybe you even did well in college – really well. And then you started a career. And maybe you’ve been really successful in that career. Yet all the while you can’t help but think: “I am an imposter.” Have you ever thought –

They’ll get me on the next test.

I made it past the interview, but they’ll figure me out eventually.

Because of these feelings, you continue to push yourself, working extra hard to make sure you’re not “found out”.

This describes the “Imposter Syndrome”, a condition many people deal with on a daily basis. Read all about it: Diversity in Science Carnival: IMPOSTER SYNDROME EDITION! (and pay attention to the pictures – they’re great!)

I still think my university is going to contact me someday and revoke my degree…